Snapshot: Carlos Cano

Carlos Cano Program Manager of Worker Cooperatives, Urban Upbound How did you get into this work? Back in 2014, Urban Upbound began the process of developing a worker cooperative in Astoria Houses, a NYCHA development in Western Queens. I was asked to lead the project in late 2015. I had been working with another program that also served the Astoria Houses community and I had developed strong ties to it. That, in addition to my background in marketing and operations proved key as the program grew. We have launched two worker cooperatives (OnPoint Security and OSHA Solutions) and a third, Paw Partners is almost there. We are very happy and excited for them!   What does ‘solidarity economy’ mean to you? I see it as a market system in which actors’ decisions are not based solely on what is ‘best’ for themselves, usually with making/saving money as the main criteria, but are rather based on whether they create the most possible value in society. It’s a system built not around the lone individual but instead the inextricable relationship between a […]

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New BQLT Partnership!

New BQLT Partnership! We are extremely excited to announce our new partnership with the Brooklyn Queens Land Trust, an organization that stewards 37 different gardens in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. Their gardens serve as classrooms, food production sites (over 92% of their gardens grow fruits and vegetables), community spaces, and active green spaces, and the majority are located in low-income neighborhoods where land is often being turned over to real estate developers or left vacant. The Brooklyn Queens Land Trust exists to establish a community of gardeners in Brooklyn and Queens to: educate and inspire people of all ages to become successful and environmentally responsible gardeners; support community involvement in community gardening, neighborhood beautification and open space enhancement through activities and programs; and promote the interests of community gardens.   What does this mean?  If you are a member of any of these gardens, you are also a member of the Cooperative Economics Alliance of NYC at no cost to you! Read about all the benefits that come with a CEANYC membership. If you are a member of […]

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Welcoming New York City Network of Worker Cooperatives!

We are pleased to announce that as part of a new partnership with New York City Network of Worker Cooperatives (NYC NoWC), all NYC NoWC cooperatives are now members (at no additional cost) of the Cooperative Economics Alliance of New York City! As an alliance of worker cooperatives, food cooperatives, community land trusts, housing cooperatives/HDFCs, community development credit unions, community gardens, CSAs, and assisting organizations, we are excited to welcome more worker-owners! With over two thousand groups coming from a range of sectors, NYC’s solidarity and cooperative economy is one of the biggest in the United States. CEANYC brings us together to purchase from each other, learn new skills, and speak with one voice for economic development that benefits, instead of exploits, our communities. NYC NoWC members are encouraged to be active in helping us realize our vision for a truly cooperative city, where we work meet our needs by cooperating together, across all different kinds of co-ops and solidarity enterprises. Here are a few ways NYC NoWC members can make the most of a free CEANYC membership: Cooperative Leadership […]

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About Our Directory

In times of crisis and corruption, we continue to see which solutions work—repair homes, sustain food sources, create jobs, save lives—and which ones do not. When Hurricane Sandy hit New York City in 2012, we were reminded that cooperation in the form of community self-organization and networks of solidarity kept the death count low while large non-profit organizations, corporations, and government support failed to make long-term and effective change. People share, barter, crowdsource, and sacrifice in order to replenish what has been taken from them and maintain what little they may have. Such collaboration has been and will be our greatest strength in the face of other inevitable natural disasters, increased militarization, police brutality, gentrification, and economic crisis. While the resilience and power of a people united is most visible in times of catastrophe, these networks of inter- and cross- community support are operating every day around the world, including here in New York City. Yet, the solidarity economy, despite its rich and diverse history as well as intuitive logic, remains an ‘alternative’ to our dominant system: extractive capitalism. In order to figure […]

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